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edi1967
« on: April 23, 2014, 03:03:55 pm »
Witness for the Prosecution (1957)
Posted By : edi1967 | Date : 19 Apr 2014 21:31:51 | Comments : 3 | |



Witness for the Prosecution (1957)
Testimone d'accusa - Témoin ŕ charge - Zeugin der Anklage - Testigo de cargo
A Film by Billy Wilder
DVD9 | VIDEO_TS | PAL | 1,66:1 | 4:3 | 720x576 | 01:51:33 | 5% Recovery | 6.9 GB
Languages Available: English, Spanish, German, French, Italian 2.0 AC3
Subtitle: English, French, Italian, Dutch, Finnish, Greek | Extra: Menů, Scene Selection
Genre: Drama, Crime, Mistery | Nominated for 6 Oscars. Another 3 wins & 8 nominations

It's Britain, 1953. Upon his return to work following a heart attack, irrepressible barrister Sir Wilfrid Robarts, known as a barrister for the hopeless, takes on a murder case, much to the exasperation of his medical team, led by his overly regulated private nurse, Miss Plimsoll, who tries her hardest to ensure that he not return to his hard living ways - including excessive cigar smoking and drinking - while he takes his medication and gets his much needed rest.

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Sir Wilfrid Robarts (Charles Laughton), a master barrister in ill health, takes on Leonard Vole (Tyrone Power) as a client, despite the objections of his private nurse, Miss Plimsoll (Elsa Lanchester), who says the doctor warns him against taking on any criminal cases. Vole is accused of murdering Mrs. Emily French (Norma Varden), a rich, older widow who had become enamored of him, going so far as to make him the main beneficiary of her will. Strong circumstantial evidence all points to Vole as the killer.



When Sir Wilfrid speaks with Vole's German wife Christine (Marlene Dietrich), he finds her rather cold and self-possessed, but she does provide an alibi. Therefore, he is greatly surprised when she is called as a witness for the prosecution. While a wife cannot testify against her husband, it is shown that Christine was in fact still married to another man when she wed Leonard (although Vole, believing in good faith that he was married to Christine at the time, might still have qualified under the spousal privilege rule). She testifies that Leonard admitted to her that he had killed Mrs. French, and that her conscience forced her to finally tell the truth.



During the trial (in the Old Bailey, carefully recreated by art director Alexandre Trauner), Sir Wilfrid is contacted by a mysterious woman, who (for a fee) provides him with letters written by Christine herself to a mysterious lover named Max. The affair revealed by this correspondence gives Christine such a strong motive to have lied that the jury finds Leonard not guilty.



However, Sir Wilfrid is troubled by the verdict. His instincts tell him that it was "...too neat, too tidy, and altogether...too symmetrical!". His belief proves correct when Christine, left alone with him by chance in the courtroom, takes the opportunity to take credit for the verdict. Sir Wilfrid had told her before the trial that "...no jury would believe an alibi given by a loving wife". So, she had instead given testimony implicating her husband, had then forged the letters to the non-existing Max and had herself in disguise played the mysterious woman handing over the letters which then discredited her own testimony and led to the acquittal. She furthermore admits that she saved Leonard even though she knew he was guilty because she loves him.



Leonard has overheard Christine's admission and Sir Wilfred was infuriated for being had. Being protected by double jeopardy, Leonard coldly tells Christine that he has met a younger woman (Ruta Lee) and leaves her. In a jealous rage, Christine grabs a knife used as evidence (which had been subtly highlighted by Sir Wilfrid) and stabs Leonard to death. After she is taken away by the police, Sir Wilfrid, urged on by Miss Plimsoll, declares that he will take on her defense.



Witness for the Prosecution is a 1957 American courtroom drama film set in the Old Bailey in London. The film, based on a short story (and later play) by Agatha Christie, deals with the trial of a man accused of murder. The first film adaptation of this story, it stars Tyrone Power (in his final screen role), Marlene Dietrich, and Charles Laughton, and features Elsa Lanchester. The film was adapted by Larry Marcus, Harry Kurnitz and the film's director Billy Wilder.

Italian Storyline - French Storyline - German Storyline - Spanish Storyline




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ORIGINAL TITLE: Witness for the Prosecution
GENRE: Drama , Yellow
YEAR : 1957
DIRECTOR: Billy Wilder
Screenplay : Billy Wilder , Harry Kurnitz
Actors : Tyrone Power , Marlene Dietrich, Charles Laughton , Elsa Lanchester , John Williams ( II ), Henry Daniell , Ian Wolfe, Torin Thatcher , Norma Varden, Una O'Connor , Francis Compton, Philip Tonge , Ruta Lee

PHOTO : Russell Harlan
ASSEMBLY : Daniel Mandell
MUSIC : Matty Malneck
PRODUCTION: Hornblow ARTHUR JR. , EDWARD EDWARD SMALL FOR SMALL PRODUCTIONS
DISTRIBUTION: DEAR
COUNTRY: USA
DURATION : 114 Min
SIZE: 35 MM

NOTES: - GOLDEN GLOBE 1958 In ELSA LANCHESTER AS SUPPORTING ACTRESS . - David di Donatello Awards 1958 In LAUGHTON CHARLES BEST ACTOR AS A FOREIGN .

SUBJECT: the play of the same name by Agatha Christie